City of Stanton Launches “Cease the Grease” Campaign

When grease, fats, and other oils are poured down kitchen drains, they tend to clog up the pipes. Many studies have shown that pouring used cooking oil down kitchen sinks can lead to clogging. This is because as the grease travels from the kitchen sink into the sewers and water treatment plants, they tend to cool, harden, and eventually build up on the pipes. They can accumulate over time and block certain pipes, causing very costly damage. Not only that, but clogging the pipes in cities can cause sewage and other wastes to be directed instead to waterways and other bodies of water, which can be harmful to both the environment and to residents of surrounding areas. On July 24, 2013, the city of Stanton officially started the “Cease the Grease” campaign with a press conference and light reception for residents. Although it shares the same name as a Dallas campaign to educate residents on proper grease disposal, Stanton’s campaign takes it a step further. With local government-provided services that will actually enable residents to properly dispose of their grease, the campaign is geared to protect the environment, and reduce potential costs that can be caused by sewer and pipeline blockages. Local leaders are thinking ahead, not just to save residents tax dollars in the future, but to save the environment, as well. Residents are now encouraged to recycle fats, oils, and grease rather than risk improper disposal. They can collect their oils and grease and with the help of the Orange County Sanitation District and CR&R Environmental Services, a Stanton-based recycling company, eventually recycle the grease. Residents can call...

Stricter Regulations Approved for Southern California Beach Fire Rings

More than 500 fire pits dot the Southern California coast to be used by beachgoers year-round, free of charge. For many, spending the day in the water and starting a bonfire in the fire pits at night are a cheap and almost traditional way to spend summer—and definitely not something they are ready to give up anytime soon. Last month, however, the Southern Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) regulators suggested the removal or relocation of many fire pits down the Southern California coast. They claim that small particle pollution, which come from the bonfires pose a serious health risk to the residents of the beachfront houses on the coast. A study conducted has shown that the pollution from one fire pit alone is comparable to standing next to three diesel-run vehicles. Since more than one fire pit is located on each given beach—with Huntington Beach boasting over 500 fire pits on its shores—the accumulation of the small particle pollution has made beachfront residents and air regulators worried for their health. Additionally, as they are now, most of the fire pits are too close to the homes of residents; the buffer zone is less than 700 feet, especially in beaches like Newport. The air district proposed that new regulations be imposed on the fire rings. Studies supported by the air quality regulators found that over 700 feet away, the particle pollution becomes more distributed and scattered than when they are closer. This led to the proposal that fire pits must be at least 700 feet away from any residences, unless they are spaced out 100 feet apart. The new proposal...

SoCal’s New Sustainability Strategy Is An Impressive Step Forward

We expect forward-looking sustainability planning from places like  Portland, Vancouver and Copenhagen.  Los Angeles?  Not so much.   Southern California is a region much better known for environmental  problems than solutions, which is precisely why its new, 25-year Sustainable Communities Strategy, adopted unanimously last week by the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), is so significant. http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2012/04/14/463702/socals-new-sustainability-strategy-is-an-impressive-step-forward/?mobile=nc...

Water, at the Intersection of Technology & Humanity

IRVINE, Calif., April 10, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — On May 9, 2012, the Beckman Center will host the UCI’s Urban Water Research Center’s Annual Dorothy M. Green Memorial Lecture Series “Women in Water.” The Beckman Center is adjacent to the University of California Irvine campus. Registration begins at 5:30pm, followed by keynote speaker Ms. Katie Porter at 6:00pm. Her presentation will conclude with a reception in the lobby open to all attendees....

OCWD Awarded $1,000,000 Grant Towards Initial Expansion Of The Groundwater Replenishment System

As the regional agency administrator for Proposition 84 Integrated Regional Water Management (IRWM) Program for the Santa Ana River Watershed, the Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority (SAWPA) recently announced millions of dollars in grants awarded by the California Department of Water Resources. The Orange County Water District (OCWD) received a $1M water sustainability grant for its 30 million gallon per day (MGD) Groundwater Replenishment System (GWRS) Initial Expansion.    Click on link to read the full article.  ...